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1971 Humber Sceptre

This stunning little Humber Sceptre has only covered 86,812 Miles it has stunning paintwork with a real deep shine all over I am sure the pictures do not give it justice for the condition the paint work is in.

Product Description

This stunning little Humber Sceptre has only covered 86,812 Miles it has stunning paintwork with a real deep shine all over I am sure the pictures do not give it justice for the condition the paint work is in.

The doors all close perfectly into position and the under body has been totally treated the chrome work is in superb condition as well as the wheel trims, it has a vinyl roof which is absolutely superb.

The interior is in excellent condition and is very comfortable indeed the wood trim is also in excellent condition for its age.

It comes with overdrive

I have driven this car around the country lanes and what a pleasure it is to drive it drives absolutely superb powered by a 1725cc engine which is very responsive and starts instantly It also comes with overdrive it has a very tidy engine bay.

View by appointment only

Part exchange welcome

Please call for more details

  • petrol/manual
  • 12 months mot
  • only covered 86,812 miles
  • 1971
  • 1725cc

ORIGINS OF THE HUMBER MOTOR CARS:
In order to trace the development of the Humber motor car it is necessary to go back to the 1887 when Thomas Humber formed a partnership with the prominent 19th century financier, Harry j. Lawson. In subsequent year Lawson appears to have largely taken over day-to-day running of the Humber company, and it was under his auspices that the first moves towards motor car production were made.
Lawson had himself begun his working life as a cycle maker, but quickly recognised the potential of motor vehicles
He had set up the British Motor Syndicate with the aim of buying up as many existing and future patents as possible relating to motor manufacturing – both in this country and, to a lesser extent, abroad. Patented innovations concerning the new ‘science’ of motor engineering were numerous at this time, and it was the British Motor Syndicates desire to gain a monopoly in what Lawson saw as the next big growth industry